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Things to do March 4 - 10, 2021

March 5th

 

Battle of Hampton Roads Series: Spirits on USS Monitor

The Mariners’ Museum and Park  - March 5; 12 p.m.

Free virtual lecture presented by John V. Quarstein, director emeritus of the USS Monitor Center. Part of The Mariners’ Museum’s Commemoration of the Battle of Hampton Roads. About this presentation: Drinking and fighting always seem to have some type of connection. Grog was first concocted in the 17th century eventually mixing rum, gin, or whiskey with water and lime/lemon. It was a boost to sailors fighting boredom on long sea journeys or giving a surge of instant courage when preparing for battle. Enlisted men could only drink when their grog ration was issued or when they were off duty. Officers, however, drank without care and were only punished when their intoxication became debilitating. Monitor’s paymaster, William Keeler, fought to do away with the grog ration saying drinking was the “curse of the navy.” Many Civil War soldiers and sailors were plagued by whiskey, whiskey, and more whiskey. 100 Museum Drive, 757-596-2222. Advance registration is required. Click here for more information.

 

 

March 6th

 

Battle of Hampton Roads Series: The Development of European Ironclads

The Mariners’ Museum and Park  - March 6; 10 a.m.

Free virtual lecture presented by Erika Cosme, content and interpretation developer. Follow along with Erika Cosme, content and interpretation developer at The Mariners’ Museum, as she takes you through the reasons and significance of ironclads and the technological impact they had on navies around the world. About the presentation: USS Monitor and CSS Virginia may be revolutionary ships. Neither was the first ironclad constructed, nor was the United States the first country to consider such a vessel. The concept of an ironclad ship dates back centuries before, and many were built and saw action before the culminating event called Battle of Hampton Roads. Beginning with the earliest notion of an ironclad and moving into the mid-19th century, this program will introduce why they were created, how they evolved, and their impact on naval advancement worldwide. 100 Museum Drive, 757-596-2222. Advance registration is required. Click here for more information.

 

Battle of Hampton Roads Series: Foods and Feasts

The Mariners’ Museum and Park  - March 6; 11 a.m.

Free virtual lecture presented by The Mariners’ Museum Interpretation Team and Eric Jeannerett, costumed interpreter. In observance of the Battle of Hampton Roads’ 159th anniversary, join the Mariners’ Interpretation Team and Eric Jeannerett, a longtime costumed interpreter, as they reveal important details about the history of Civil War food and present a comparison of food for enlisted and officers aboard USS Monitor. About the presentation: Fresh and delicious food was not common during wartime, and this was especially true during the Civil War. George Geer, a First-Class Fireman who was stationed aboard Monitor, wrote in a letter to his wife in May 1862: “On Mondays Wednesdays and Saturdays we have Been Soup or perhaps a better name would be to call it Been Water. I am often tempted to strip off my shirt and make a dive and see if there realy is Beens in the Bottom that gives it the flavor. I think there must be but I seldom see them.” 100 Museum Drive, 757-596-2222. Advance registration is required. Click here for more information.

 

Battle of Hampton Roads Series: Romanticism and Commerical Patriotism

The Mariners’ Museum and Park  - March 6; 1 p.m.

Free virtual lecture presented by Kyra Duffley, digital content assistant at The Mariners’ Museum. Have you ever wondered how paintings, especially ones depicted of war and fighting, are portrayed with such intricate details and vibrancy? Or have you questioned whether what is seen in the painting is what actually occurred? Come learn from Kyra Duffley, digital content assistant at The Mariners’ Museum, as she brings an enlightening perspective to the Battle of Hampton Roads in the form of art. About the presentation: While mostly associated with France, the artistic movement of Romanticism can be seen in the way in which the American Civil War was depicted in commercial art and print media. Focusing on prints depicting the Battle of Hampton Roads, this art-based program will be a discussion of the importance and influence of commercial prints and printmaking as well as the illustrated news during the Civil War to not only tell eyewitness accounts and create a commercialized patriotism, but also to make the Civil War the first “illustrated” war. 100 Museum Drive, 757-596-2222. Advance registration is required. Click here for more information.

 

Battle of Hampton Roads Series: Follow the Phoenix

The Mariners’ Museum and Park  - March 6; 2 p.m.

Free virtual lecture presented by Hannah Fleming, maritime archaeologist at The Mariners’ Museum. Come discover a fragile reminder of the past with Hannah Fleming, maritime archaeologist at The Mariners’ Museum, when she pieces together the history of an artifact found from USS Monitor. About the presentation: Finding archaeological artifacts often leads to more questions than answers. Dirty, sometimes fragmentary, and often out of place, a new find begs the questions: What is it? Who used it? Why is this here? Where was it made? This talk traces the history of one such USS Monitor artifact, the Resurgam bottle, otherwise known as the phoenix bottle, from production and use, through loss and recovery, to identification and new life in The Mariners’ Museum and Park. 100 Museum Drive, 757-596-2222. Advance registration is required. Click here for more information.

 

Owl Prowl

Newport News Park - March 6; 6 p.m.

“Hoo” are the different kinds of owls that make Newport News Park their home? Join us at the Discovery Center to learn about these amazing night-time hunters and their adaptations for survival. After a short introduction, we’ll take a short hike to find out “hoo” we can find! Be sure to dress for the weather. No reservations required. Social distancing and mask wearing will be in place. 13560 Jefferson Avenue, 757-886-7916. Click here for more information.

 

The Children

Peninsula Community Theatre  - March 6; 7:30 p.m.

This is a streaming event. Two retired nuclear scientists reside in an isolated cottage by the sea as the world around them crumbles. Together they are going to live forever on yogurt and yoga, until an old friend arrives with a frightening request. This is a registered event. 10251 Warwick Boulevard, 757-595-5728. Click here for more information.

 

March 7th

 

Bird Walk

Newport News Park - March 7; 7 a.m.

Join other bird enthusiasts and enjoy viewing birds in their natural habitat. No experience necessary! The group meets in Picnic Area 1, behind the ranger station at Newport News Park, but may drive to other areas of the park during the program. Dress for the weather, bring water and hand sanitizer, and don't forget your binoculars! 13560 Jefferson Avenue, 757-888-3333. Click here for more information.

 

The Children

Peninsula Community Theatre  - March 7; 2:30 p.m.

This is a streaming event. Two retired nuclear scientists reside in an isolated cottage by the sea as the world around them crumbles. Together they are going to live forever on yogurt and yoga, until an old friend arrives with a frightening request. This is a registered event. 10251 Warwick Boulevard, 757-595-5728. Click here for more information.

 

 

March 8th

Virtual Maritime Mondays

The Mariners’ Museum and Park  - March 8; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Hop online for a reading adventure every Monday! Fun for both children and caregivers, enjoy a book reading with Lauren T. Furey, manager of visitor engagement, and discover an interesting artifact from our Museum’s Collection! Designed for children from 18 months to 8 years, Lauren takes you and your little mariners on a journey to show how we are all connected to the world’s waters. Be sure to register in advance, and join us for a new book every week! 100 Museum Drive, 757-596-2222. Click here for more information.

March 9th

25 Mics Online – Monthly Free Open Mic

Downing-Gross Cultural Arts Center - March 9; 7 p.m.

Join our monthly free open mic on the second Tuesday of every month from the comfort of your own home. 25 Mics Online is hosted by the incredible Nina Brewton, who creates a warm and welcoming environment to have conversations and share your art with your community. We have had poets and singers, monologue-readers, and even a magician! 2410 Wickham Avenue, 757-247-8950. Click here for more information.

March 10th

Story and a Walk

Newport News Park - March 10; 10 a.m.

Bring the kids out for mid-week storytime at the Newport News Park Discovery Center! A park naturalist reads a nature-themed children's book, then leads the group outside to see nature in "real life," so be sure to dress for the weather! The program is free of charge and great activity for preschoolers or homeschoolers. Social distancing and masks required. 13560 Jefferson Avenue, 757-886-7916. Click here for more information.

 

Speakers bureau: The Great Halifax Explosion

The Mariners’ Museum and Park  - March 10; 1 p.m.

A virtual lecture presented by Dan Wood, docent at The Mariners’ Museum and Park. Join us online with Dan Wood, a docent at The Mariners’ Museum and Park, when he presents on a devastating man-made explosion during World War I that significantly altered relationships between the US and Canada. Viewers are welcome to send Dan comments or questions, which he will answer following the presentation. About the presentation: The little-known story of what is arguably the most devastating man-made explosion ever to occur prior to the nuclear age. Deep in the unusually cold and stormy winter of 1918, a ship full of unstable military explosives exploded in the harbor of Halifax, Nova Scotia. In an instant, almost 11,000 people were killed or injured, and over 30,000 more were left homeless or inadequately sheltered on the eve of a monumental blizzard. The subsequent relief operations featured a massive response from individuals and organizations in the United States, radically changing relationships and perceptions between the people of the US and Canada. 100 Museum Drive, 757-596-2222. Advance registration is required. Click here for more information.

Continuing Events

Exploration Ice Age: Unearthing Extinctions

Virginia Living Museum  - Continuing through April 11
The sixth mass extinction is happening right now! Called the Quaternary Extinction, it includes the loss of the animals found in North America at the end of the ice age, such as saber-tooth cats, mammoths, and mastodons. Many of their relatives are still around today – some even live in a habitat along the Virginia Living Museum’s outdoor trail. It is predicted around one million animal and plant species are currently threatened with extinction. Discover how you can help the outlook of our future biodiversity by unearthing extinctions of the past in this temporary exhibit. Extinctions are not just historical events, they are also happening right now. To protect Earth’s biodiversity in the present day, we can look to the past to learn how ancient life survived. 524

  1. Clyde Morris Boulevard, 757-595-1900. Click here for more information.