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Things to do January 28 - February 3, 2021

January 29th

The Life and Tryals of the Gentleman Pirate

The Mariners’ Museum and Park - January 29; 12 p.m. – 1 p.m. - 

Presented by Jeremy R. Moss, author and historian 
Join us on Friday, January 29 for a thrilling virtual lecture with author and historian Jeremy R. Moss as he presents about the golden age of piracy and its connection to the Hampton Roads area. Viewers are welcome to send Moss any comments or questions during the presentation, and he will answer following his talk. Chesapeake native Jeremy R. Moss is an accomplished lawyer and lobbyist in Alexandria, Virginia. An emerging author and freelance historian, Moss’s research and writing are focused on piracy and early colonial maritime history. His book, The Life and Tryals of the Gentleman Pirate Major Stede Bonnet, brings to life the golden age of piracy. Awash with myth-busting history, Moss tells the story of the real pirates of the Caribbean, sharing accounts of daily life, social issues, natural disasters, political intrigues, bloody battles; and, of course, buried treasure, walking the plank, flying the Jolly Roger, pirate-speak and more, all while weaving in interesting connections to the history of Hampton Roads. 100 Museum Drive, 757-596-2222. Advance registration is required. Click here for more information.

February 1st

Virtual Maritime Mondays

The Mariners’ Museum and Park - February 1; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.
Hop online for a reading adventure every Monday!
Fun for both children and caregivers, enjoy an interactive book reading with Lauren T. Furey, manager of visitor engagement. Designed for children from 18 months to 8 years, Lauren takes you and your little champions on a journey to show how we are all connected to the world’s waters. Be sure to register in advance, and join us for a new book every week! 100 Museum Drive, 757-596-2222. Click here for more information.

Celebrating Black History Month

The Mariners’ Museum and Park - February 1; 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.

BLACK HISTORY MONTH SERIES

Come celebrate online with The Mariners’ Museum and Park for the month of February as it recognizes Africa and its people and the key role they played in maritime trade and global expansion for centuries. For centuries, Africa and its people have played a key role in maritime trade and global expansion. Yet much of Black history has been told from a lens of oppression and the hardships Black people have had to overcome. This month, the Museum will honor and pay tribute to the generations of Blacks, Africans, and African Americans who have struggled, and reveal more about who they are and the places from which they came.

From the individual hidden voices that are now being heard to the ancient kingdoms that populated the African continent, Black and African history is intertwined with incredible stories that illustrate both adversity and diversity. Journey with the Museum and its Interpretation Department this month (and beyond) as we present a variety of virtual programs focusing on the rich history and culture of Blacks, Africans, and African Americans who helped to shape the world. Viewers are welcome to send comments or questions to staff in the Interpretation Department, which they will answer following the presentation.

100 Museum Drive, 757-596-2222. Click here for more information.

 

 

February 3rd

Speakers Bureau: Jack Tar on the Waterfront

The Mariners’ Museum and Park - February 3; 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
BLACK HISTORY MONTH SERIES

Join us online with Ed Moore, a docent at The Mariners’ Museum and Park, when he examines the Jack Tars and how their influence on the Colonial America waterfront created a culture that valued freedom and led to a revolution. “We Owe Allegiance To No Crown” was spoken by the American sailor during the Age of Revolution. The waterfront culture developing in Colonial America valued freedom of thought, freedom of travel, and freedom of lifestyle. Integrated by nationality, ethnicity, and race, the Jack Tars challenged ideals, hierarchy, and values, influencing first the waterfront then ultimately, a society built on revolution and freedom. Viewers are welcome to send Ed any comments or questions during the presentation, and he will answer following his talk. 100 Museum Drive, 757-596-2222. Click here for more information.